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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
their next president. registration of candidates starts on sunday, kicking off election campaigning. three hopefuls have already said they're ready for the job. the ruling party is ahead in the opinion polls. pak is a daughter of former president. she's aiming to be the country's to be the first woman president. moon was a close aide to the late president. an independent contender. awning is a software entrepreneur who gained fame for his anti-virus programs. some call him the bill gates of south korea. representatives of moon and aung have been talking about joining forces. they held their first and only debate on wednesday to decide who should go up against pak. >> translator: i think i'm the best prepared candidate for those who want to run for president because of my experience in national politics. >> moon criticized aung for his lack of political experience, saying he's better suited to lead the country. aung responded by saying that south korean politics needs to change and that he is the one who can do that. >> translator: one citizen told me i should run for president. otherwe, th
under investigation for misuse of campaign funds and was facing a congressional ethics probe. he won re-election to the house in november. jackson's seat is now expected to be filled through a special election. mortgage rates in the u.s. fell to record lows this week-- helping to boost home sales. the average 30-year loan rate dropped to 3.3%, the lowest on record since records began in 1971. on wall street today stocks moved slightly higher ahead of the thanksgiving holiday. the dow jones industrial average gained 48 points to close under 12,837. the nasdaq rose nearly ten points to close above 2,926. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and more now on the mid east story. will the cease fire reached today between israel and hamas, hold? and what about longer-term, more difficult issues between the two sides? ray suarez picks it up. >> suarez: i'm joined now by veteraniplomat and former ambassor niclas bus. and hisham melhem, washington bureau chief for al arabiya tv. mr. ambassador, as you heard from the reporters earlier in the program, the shooting has s
: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten island. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public
): we demand the president listens to the people who chose him, the people who elected him so he would defend the people. >> reporter: that could provoke more trouble after a weekend of violence hitting liberal and secular factions against morse's islamist supporters. last night in cairo, protesters threw rocks at police who fired back with tear gas. demonstrators also clashed with pro-morsi egyptians. attacks on the local offices of the muzz lum brotherhood left one teenager dead and dozens of people wounded. thousands of the president's backers staged rallies in several cities. >> we support mohamed morsi's correct decision and eventually the good from the bad will be distinguishable. we support dr. morsi. >> u.s. officials raised concerns about morsi's decree. today the state department's victoria newlyand called for calm. >> what is important to us is that these issues be slelgted through dialogues, that these issues be selgtzed democraticry. we are encouraged that the various important stakeholders in egypt are now talking to each other, that president morsi is consulting on the w
obama sat down with mexico's president-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contrib
the post-election changes in the house of representatives. >> woodruff: would building walls protect cities like new york from flooding after major storms? hari sreenivasan examines that as part of our "coping with climate change" series. >> as people continue to clean up from hurricane sandy, we look at what it could take to keep this damage from happening again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with
. he is known for speaking his mind. he gave his latest opinion while preparing for a national election next month. he now leads a new opposition group. he made the remarks to foreign correspondents in tokyo. >> translator: it would be good to have a simulation on japan holding nuclear weapons because it can act as a deterrent. the decision of acquiring them or not can be decided later. >> he announced in april the tokyo government planned to the privately owned senkaku islands in the east china sea. they stepped in and nationalized the islands and china and taiwan claimed the territory and they have straightened relations. >>> a former japanese prime minister says he won't be running in the lower house election. he says he can't support some of the party ideas. the democratic party leadership plans to endorse candidates only if they accept certain policies. >> i feel a strong affection for the democratic party. i let the liberal democratic party to create the dpj. so this is a matter of great personal importance to me. >> he is opposed to japan joining the talks on the transpacific par
has a two point lead over moon. the election is scheduled for december 19th. who ever wins mustards diplomats with japan. japan claims islands in the water separating the nations but south korea controls territory. both candidates say that's not up for negotiation. still park says japan is an important friend. she wants to increase economic cooperation. moon says leaders of both countries should make efforts to present be a past from hinder ties but he's firmer on certain cases. he says japanese officials are distorting facts on long standing issues. the debate over territory and history will continue after south korea elect a new president but some business people say the coverage misrepresents what's really going on. they say people from both countries are finding new ways to work together all the time. >> reporter: this restaurant serves japanese noodle ramen. the staffere eaks japanese. the menu is written in japanese but this restaurant is in seoul. >> translator: political issues will not affect the popularity of japanese food culture here. political disputes and culture excha
mention and that election the next coupl of weeks playing into tse events? do people on the ground see this -- some level of this as political posturing? >> well, absolutely. there were many, many people during the campaign who felt that perhaps-- and certainly on the flip side, on the other side palestinians and in fact palestinian president mahmoud abbas accused israel of creating this campaign or going forward with the campaign to try and sabotage the u.n. bid -- the palestinian u.n. bid and also as a ploy for ection -- for garnering votes for upcoming elections. for the incumbent government. the fact of the matter is, when i spoke with people on the ground today in the south, these are the constituents that would primarily vote for prime minister netanyahu and right now they're not very happy with him and many, many people said they're withdrawing their vote in the coming election, that they will not be voting for his likud party. they're unhappy with the fact that there was a pullback from a full-scale invasion. people living in the south who, again, have been through this situati
're defensive. tell us more. >> so into the u.s. election, especially given that the polls were leaning towards obama, we had taken a defensive stance already. we had gone slightly underweight equities, and added more things like high-yield mortgage debt, emerging market debt, and mortgage-backed securities, that will yield as much as capital appreciation, and investments that have lower volatility than the stock market. so we have an overweight there. those investments i just spoke about, that's about 24% of our portfolio right now, and that's definitely helped us get through the last few weeks without giving up much of our gains. >> susie: tell us a little bit about -- well, you are on the buying side with equities, what are you buying? are you in u.s. stocks? international stocks? what is the mix? >> sure. one of the interesting things i think over the last few months, and maybe this isn't putting it very elegantly, but i like to think about it as revenge of the global investor. for all of 2011, and the start of 2012, we saw the s&p as one of the world's leading stock markets. and a lot of i
to bring weight to the negotiations. we should also note that israelis will have election next january and further casualties on their side would not look good on the current leadership. prime minister netanyahu threatened a ground invasion. most here think that would not have been a practical option. from the hamas point of view, they got one of the things that they have long asked for. the israelis are expected to ease the siege that would allow more movement of people and goods. so hamas leadership can justify the cease-fire by saying that they achieved something. >> k oft hei, you know the history of such agreements. how long do you think this truce will last? >> well, we have to be cause about how we frame this. and we have seen a number of them broken. so consider who played the role of mediator. egyptian leaders hosted the talks and acted as a regional broker for the deal. and it's not insignificant that egyptian foreign minister amoh announced the agreement. of course, secretary clinton was there behind him but egyptian president mohamed morsi has deep connection with hamas and
from the u.s. >>> when the newly-elected congress is sworn in in january, it will be more religiously diverse than ever. the 113th congress will still have a protestant majority, but for the first time, it will include a hindu representative, a buddhist senator and the first member to self-identify as a "none," meaning no religious affiliation. the percentage of catholic members grew, up to 30%, while the total number of jews dropped slightly. >>> in other news, the church of england will be keeping its policy of no female bishops. at the church's general synod meeting this week, delegates failed to approve a measure that would have allowed women to serve as bishops. the measure needed a two-thirds majority to pass, and it fell short by just a handful of votes. several other anglican jurisdictions have female bishops, including the u.s., australia, new zealand and, as of just last week, southern africa. the current archbishop of canterbury rowan williams and his newly-named successor justin welby had both supported the measure. >>> the vatican announced this week that prominent americ
of the increase slowed the same month as election day, and as talks over avoidg the fisc cliff heated up in washington. fewer americans filed for unemployment insurance for the first time last week. initial jobless claims fell by 41,000 as the impact of super- storm sandy on the job market began to ease. still, new claims remain over 400,000 thanks to the storm. on wall street: the dow closed up 48 points, the nasdaq added almost 10, and the s&p 500 finished higher by three. >> susie: stocks also rose on news of a ceasefire in the fighting between hamas and israel in the gaza strip. the announcement came after a week of rocket attacks and counter-attacks that has killed an estimated 150 people. most of the dead are palestinians. and just before that agreement to end hostilities, a bomb exploded in a tel aviv bus station injuring 27. >> tom: i don't wake up trying to solve for wall street, i wake up trying to solve for our members and customers each and every day. still ahead, we talk health care reform with florida's largest health insurer, chairman and c.e.o. of florida blue, patrick ge
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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